The Denise Dutson Team


Photo by Craig Adderley from Pexels

Housing design has undergone significant changes in the past few decades, with open concepts and flexible living arrangements quickly taking over. Such designs reflect, in part, the increased prevalence of multi-generational families, in which family members of all ages live together.

Why Today's Residents Love Multi-Generational Arrangements

During the Great Recession, the rise of multi-generational living largely stemmed from financial concerns. For years, young adults simply couldn't afford to move out. That has since changed, with low unemployment rates and a fast-paced housing market encouraging young buyers to invest in condominiums, townhouses, and single-family homes.

Despite recent housing developments, many young people still prefer to reside with close family members for purposes of convenience or family togetherness. This is particularly prominent in communities in which cultural norms dictate that young adults will continue to live with their elders long after they have completed their schooling, secured jobs, and even established long-term relationships or had children of their own. The close connections fostered by multi-generational arrangements are not nearly as easy to replicate elsewhere.

What to Look For in Multi-Generational Homes

There's a lot to love about multi-generational living, but such arrangements can feel stifling in the wrong setting. Some houses simply aren't designed to accommodate anything beyond the nuclear family. Thankfully, creative construction is on the rise, with flexible solutions available to help families make the most of once unconventional setups. Key features worth seeking include:

The Opportunity for Privacy

Young adults often venture out on their own simply because they lack privacy. The right structures, however, can resolve this issue by emphasizing private spaces. For example, instead of including one master bedroom and several smaller rooms, such homes may feature multiple master bedrooms. Suites that resemble mini-apartments are even better, as they allow residents to spend entire days in private spaces if desired.

Plenty of Communal Spaces

While privacy is critical in multi-generational homes, communal spaces are just as important. Families should enjoy the opportunity to regularly spend time together. Communal dining spaces, in particular, make it easy to build close connections in a festive atmosphere. Open concept communal spaces are especially popular, as they provide an open feel while also offering flexible space that can be adapted to accommodate evolving needs.

Addressing the Concerns of Several Age Groups

Today, the very homes that require extensive baby-proofing may also need accessible features that enhance mobility for seniors. While not necessarily incompatible, these considerations can be difficult to incorporate in the same space. Universal design principles such as level-entry showers and single-story homes make life easier for residents of all ages.

Today's diverse families and housing preferences call for a broader range of housing options. Cleverly designed multi-generational homes provide an excellent opportunity to accommodate a close-knit and valuable living arrangement that will only continue to grow in prevalence in years to come.


There's nothing more satisfying than knowing exactly what you want and taking the necessary steps to get it!

Whether you're searching for the right job, your soul mate, or the home of your dreams, being clear about the results you want can help pave the way for success.

When it comes to house hunting, there are several ways to increase your chances of finding a wonderful home that meets all your criteria. By being organized, focused, and goal oriented, you'd be amazed at what you can accomplish!

Create a priority list: While a certain amount of flexibility is crucial when you're in the market for a new house, there are some things that are essential to your happiness and wellbeing. Those would be considered "must haves" or non-negotiable items.

Unless you already know exactly what you want, a priority list can help you sort out the countless options, features, and expenses you'll be weighing as you explore available listings in your price range. Your priority list can include everything from architectural style and backyard space to number of bathrooms and kitchen layout. There are literally dozens of things to consider, such as the character of the neighborhood, amount of storage space inside and outside the house, and commuting distance. Many house hunters also have a strong preference for features like working fireplaces, screened in porches, and first-floor laundry rooms. If privacy is among your top priorities, you'll want to pay extra close attention to factors like distance between houses, fencing, trees, and hedges.

Choose the right real estate agent: Although most real estate agents are knowledgeable, resourceful, and easy to work with, you don't necessarily want to sign on with the first one you meet. By talking to two or three, you can choose the one who instills the most confidence in you. Ideally, he or she should have ample experience as a buyers' agent and be familiar with the specific neighborhoods in which you're interested. It's also important that you feel comfortable with them and that you can cultivate a smooth working relationship. If you have any misgivings about their accessibility, communication style, or responsiveness, then they might not be the ideal match for your needs.

Although personal recommendations from friends and family is often the best way to find a top-notch real estate agent, online reviews can provide you with helpful insights into an agent's professionalism, personality, and track record. Most agents would also be more than happy to provide you with references of recent and current clients to contact.

While real estate professionals enter the profession for a variety of reasons, most agents genuinely enjoy working with people and get a lot of satisfaction from helping them find the house of their dreams.


This Single-Family in Sandwich, MA recently sold for $365,000. This Cape style home was sold by Denise Dutson - Kinlin Grover Real Estate.


31 Dogwood Drive , Sandwich, MA 02644

Forestdale

Single-Family

$379,000
Price
$365,000
Sale Price

3
Beds
7
Total Rooms
2
Baths
Forestdale Estates. Nicely updated cape with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths and garage, central air. Living room with fireplace, eat-in kitchen, & dining room. House plans show dining room designed as first-floor bedroom, easily converted back. Full bath with laundry completes the first floor. Second floor offers master, 2 additional bedrooms, and another full bath. Full shed dormer across the back of the home as well as front dormers. Slider into sunroom overlooking landscaped yard with irrigation. Expansive backyard completely fenced. Add one-car garage and you are home! See Floorplans! Buyer & buyers' agents always encouraged to verify information.

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When you’re searching for a place to live if you have kids, or even if you’re planning on having kids in the future, the neighborhood you choose is of concern. When you’re single, it’s easy to fill your desire for the city. You live near bars, clubs, conveniences, and more. Once you start thinking with a family in mind, your ideas shift. 


So, if you’re looking for a neighborhood with children in mind, where do you start? Read on to discover the top priorities of a kid-friendly property search. 


The Schools


Most parents put a lot of consideration into where their children will go to school. Many resources allow you to research different school districts. You can also visit schools in person, or talk to other parents and see their opinion of the local schools for specific neighborhoods. 


The Safety Of The Area


Whether you have kids or not, you want to know that the area you’re going to live in is safe. Before you select a neighborhood to live in, you’ll want to research the crime rates in the area. You might assume that individual cities and towns have better crime rates than others, but you may be surprised. Ask your local real estate agent for more information on local crime rates and how to research them. 


Sense Of Community


If you are moving with kids or planning on having a family anytime soon, you’ll want to have a supportive community surrounding you. Having a community means that there are other families around with children. This way, it will be easier for you to build a network of other moms who are in the same stage as you. Some things to consider are:


Are there sidewalks in the neighborhood?

Is there a lot of traffic in the area?

Are there places for kids to play nearby? 

Do you see families out for a walk together?


Answering these questions will give you an idea of how family-friendly your neighborhood will be. Sidewalks make the area accessible for kids to go and hang out with their friends safely. Parks and playground are not only a great place to play for kids but a great place to meet other parents. If a neighborhood has the things that you want for your family, chances are, many other families in the area feel the same way. 


Choosing a neighborhood can be difficult, but with a little research and groundwork, you’ll be able to select an excellent place for your family to live.   



Your kitchen floor is what makes a statement in your home. The floor of the kitchen sets the design tone for the entire room. The choices for your kitchen floor are seemingly endless with tile to hardwood to everything in between. While the kitchen floor may not be on the top of the list during your kitchen remodel, it should be. These floors take quite a beating due to food being dropped, entertaining, foot traffic, and just overall frequent use. The flooring of the kitchen will help to pull the look of a room together and help to add value to your home. The floors should help accent the counters, appliances, and cabinets. Here, we’ll take a look at some of the most common kitchen flooring materials with some advice on how to choose what’s right for you

   


Stone Or Tile


These choices are perfect especially if your kitchen is a heavily traveled area. Let’s face it, most kitchens are where people come in and out, looking for food! Your decision will depend on where your kitchen is to the relationships of the main entrance to your home. 


Cork


This is a durable material that’s quite versatile and available in a variety of colors to suit your style. The great thing about cork is that it is water-resistant and it reduces noise from impact. This could be a great choice if you have children who love to run around and you also have a need for a quiet space upstairs. 


Wood Floors


Wood is to kitchen flooring what granite is to kitchen countertops. Wood just makes a kitchen feel classy. It’s great under your feet and durable at the same time. Wood can withstand heavy traffic, water stains, food spills, and more. You can even go for a less expensive alternative that gives the same look and benefits of wood for less.


Vinyl Flooring


If you’re on a budget, vinyl kitchen flooring is the way to go. these floors offer a variety of styles and color choices. The material can be purchased either in tile or sheet form.


Laying Down The Flooring


One of the biggest mistakes that homeowners make is not hiring professional help when needed to install things in the home. This applies to flooring as well. If you don’t feel comfortable laying down tile, or whatever type of flooring you choose, call the people who know how to do it best. Improperly installed flooring can lead to bumps, cracks, and the need for yet another new floor much sooner. It could be worth the extra investment to hire professional help to install your new kitchen floor.




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